Photoset

Russian Ark (dir. Alexander Sokurov, 2002)

(Source: clairedenis, via royeah)

Photo
piotrch:

I got my eyes on you…  :)

piotrch:

I got my eyes on you… :)

Photoset
Photo
Photoset

f-l-e-u-r-d-e-l-y-s:

Alexa Meade, Submerges Her Subject in a Pool of Milk

In collaboration with Sheila Vand, Alexa Meade explores what happens when the canvas becomes a pool of cream. Mixing borders, expressive artists compose an identity for each image.
The artist Alexa Meade has invented a technique of painting on the surfaces of objects, people and architectural spaces to optically compress 3D space in a 2D plane. It is known for its “tableaux vivants”, where the bodies of his subjects become the canvas. Since 2012, she collaborated with the actress Sheila Vand performance on a range of projects covering various media.
In the spirit of artistic recreation, “MILK”: what will you make of me? Is their first album together. The work explores the fluidity of form over time and space.

(via filocolo)

Photo
uncried:

Everything must come from the heart, must be lived. - Pina Bausch

uncried:

Everything must come from the heart, must be lived. 
- Pina Bausch

Photo
meganmcisaac:

(photograph: july 15, 1921. Krazy Kat club in Washington.)
Los Angeles is wonderful, but this apartment just doesn’t cut it for me. It is a beautiful 1920’s apartment, but I can’t imagine feeling comfortable setting up a nook on the top of our parking “garage” while the neighbors kids run around screaming and construction of a new prison-like high-school is across the street. These photographs of the Krazy-Kat club, which was a business more than a home, are very inspiring. I love the idea of having the space for people to come together to work on art or to listen to story tellers, but one that is also free. Having something similar to Steven Arnold’s home and studio, “Zanzibar,” which used to be on the street corner of first & commonwealth, (and exactly one block from my current apartment,) in the 1980s & 90s. Personally, I dream about a nice studio and home more in the mountains, but close enough to the city so that it’s not a serious trek for friends and friends of friends. I would love to host a spot for a community to flourish.

meganmcisaac:

(photograph: july 15, 1921. Krazy Kat club in Washington.)

Los Angeles is wonderful, but this apartment just doesn’t cut it for me. It is a beautiful 1920’s apartment, but I can’t imagine feeling comfortable setting up a nook on the top of our parking “garage” while the neighbors kids run around screaming and construction of a new prison-like high-school is across the street. These photographs of the Krazy-Kat club, which was a business more than a home, are very inspiring. I love the idea of having the space for people to come together to work on art or to listen to story tellers, but one that is also free. Having something similar to Steven Arnold’s home and studio, “Zanzibar,” which used to be on the street corner of first & commonwealth, (and exactly one block from my current apartment,) in the 1980s & 90s. Personally, I dream about a nice studio and home more in the mountains, but close enough to the city so that it’s not a serious trek for friends and friends of friends. I would love to host a spot for a community to flourish.

Photo
jakestangel:

timelightbox:

Photograph by Kevin Frayer—AP 
From clashes in the West Bank and election preparations in Pakistan to the legalization of gay marriage in Colorado and battles against wildfires in California, TIME presents the best pictures of the week.
April 27, 2013. Bangladeshi relatives of garment worker Mohammed Abdullah cry as they gather around his coffin after collecting his body at a makeshift morgue in a schoolyard near a building that collapsed Wednesday in Savar, near Dhaka, Bangladesh.

I had a brief former life as a non-photograph-taker for half of my college years at NYU, where I was studied the shift from American industrialism and manufacture that lead to globalized production beginning in the 70’s and really taking hold in the 80’s-00’s. Having ridden a bicycle across the backroads of America three separate occasions and on three different routes, I’ve been witness to the slow, withering death of hundreds of American towns that were built upon manufacture, and quickly faded once these industries fled to Asia and South America. Here, corporations flocked towards a land of desperately low wages, Export Processing Zones, and environmental calamity, and more than anything, inhumane working conditions, all under the guise of “savings” and broad returns for their shareholders.
While at NYU, I primarily studied the cause and effect of this geographic shift in production. To obtain a better understanding of the economic dynamics of this shift, I took classes at NYU’s Stern School of Business. Every economics class I took at Stern was beyond despicable, primarily for the school’s myopic treatment of human capital as a number, a statistic, a vehicle to lower overall production costs.
I remember my excitement when we got to the topic of externalities, which is economics little way of saying, “oops, we affected you by accident, sorry!”. For example, China’s abhorrent ozone pollution, caused by factories that find it cheaper to blow noxious fumes into the air than to manage them, pay no damages to the Chinese citizens that now suffer from respiratory failure and pay the price every day. My professor, who was ironically Bangladeshi, simply reduced the concept of externalities to something along the lines of, “shit happens”. Then, we continued along with our studies. I was confused and upset. Here, clearly was a goliath issue in the study of economics, but Stern was clearly hellbent on the principles of Profit at Any Cost, so I stopped going to the class.
Here’s another externality. You want to know why that shirt you bought from the Gap, or JC Penny, or Topshop, or Urban Outfitters, or Banana Republic cost so damn little? You want to know why Uniqlo can sell jeans for $20? It’s because a whole chain of people (and the environment) are suffering from it. It’s because multinational corporations- like every one I just mentioned- are squeezing every cent and every opportunity out of a legion of citizens in third world countries.

This disaster in Bangladesh, which so far has a death toll of 510 people, as well as the fire that killed 115 Bangladeshis in November, is just the beginning. It’s not contained to Bangladesh, and it’s not just contained to the news, or the other side of the world, or the corporations that have lets these despicable acts go on for decades. These are the clothes that we wear on our backs, every day. These are our choices too. Look through your closet, look at the labels on your clothes, look at where they’re made. Macau, China, India, Bangladesh, Mexico, Brazil. Every time you see some rock-bottom price on a garment or appliance you buy, you need to think about how this came to be. How a t-shirt can be built from scratch and shipped across the world for $5.90. It’s not because of new efficiencies in shipping, it’s because people are getting fucked, their lives put at risk every day, for that price.


These are your dollars, and by effect, your vote towards the type of economy you want to support. Look at these photo, look at this pain and this loss, compound it thousands of times, and understand our relationship to this tragedy. I’m sad to say it will only get worse before it gets better, but only if we start now.

jakestangel:

timelightbox:

Photograph by Kevin Frayer—AP

From clashes in the West Bank and election preparations in Pakistan to the legalization of gay marriage in Colorado and battles against wildfires in California, TIME presents the best pictures of the week.

April 27, 2013. Bangladeshi relatives of garment worker Mohammed Abdullah cry as they gather around his coffin after collecting his body at a makeshift morgue in a schoolyard near a building that collapsed Wednesday in Savar, near Dhaka, Bangladesh.

I had a brief former life as a non-photograph-taker for half of my college years at NYU, where I was studied the shift from American industrialism and manufacture that lead to globalized production beginning in the 70’s and really taking hold in the 80’s-00’s. Having ridden a bicycle across the backroads of America three separate occasions and on three different routes, I’ve been witness to the slow, withering death of hundreds of American towns that were built upon manufacture, and quickly faded once these industries fled to Asia and South America. Here, corporations flocked towards a land of desperately low wages, Export Processing Zones, and environmental calamity, and more than anything, inhumane working conditions, all under the guise of “savings” and broad returns for their shareholders.


While at NYU, I primarily studied the cause and effect of this geographic shift in production. To obtain a better understanding of the economic dynamics of this shift, I took classes at NYU’s Stern School of Business. Every economics class I took at Stern was beyond despicable, primarily for the school’s myopic treatment of human capital as a number, a statistic, a vehicle to lower overall production costs.

I remember my excitement when we got to the topic of externalities, which is economics little way of saying, “oops, we affected you by accident, sorry!”. For example, China’s abhorrent ozone pollution, caused by factories that find it cheaper to blow noxious fumes into the air than to manage them, pay no damages to the Chinese citizens that now suffer from respiratory failure and pay the price every day. My professor, who was ironically Bangladeshi, simply reduced the concept of externalities to something along the lines of, “shit happens”. Then, we continued along with our studies. I was confused and upset. Here, clearly was a goliath issue in the study of economics, but Stern was clearly hellbent on the principles of Profit at Any Cost, so I stopped going to the class.

Here’s another externality. You want to know why that shirt you bought from the Gap, or JC Penny, or Topshop, or Urban Outfitters, or Banana Republic cost so damn little? You want to know why Uniqlo can sell jeans for $20? It’s because a whole chain of people (and the environment) are suffering from it. It’s because multinational corporations- like every one I just mentioned- are squeezing every cent and every opportunity out of a legion of citizens in third world countries.

This disaster in Bangladesh, which so far has a death toll of 510 people, as well as the fire that killed 115 Bangladeshis in November, is just the beginning. It’s not contained to Bangladesh, and it’s not just contained to the news, or the other side of the world, or the corporations that have lets these despicable acts go on for decades. These are the clothes that we wear on our backs, every day. These are our choices too. Look through your closet, look at the labels on your clothes, look at where they’re made. Macau, China, India, Bangladesh, Mexico, Brazil. Every time you see some rock-bottom price on a garment or appliance you buy, you need to think about how this came to be. How a t-shirt can be built from scratch and shipped across the world for $5.90. It’s not because of new efficiencies in shipping, it’s because people are getting fucked, their lives put at risk every day, for that price.

These are your dollars, and by effect, your vote towards the type of economy you want to support. Look at these photo, look at this pain and this loss, compound it thousands of times, and understand our relationship to this tragedy. I’m sad to say it will only get worse before it gets better, but only if we start now.

(via meganmcisaac)

Photo
joncarling:

weird war

joncarling:

weird war

Quote
"People say, “I’m going to sleep now,” as if it were nothing. But it’s really a bizarre activity. “For the next several hours, while the sun is gone, I’m going to become unconscious, temporarily losing command over everything I know and understand. When the sun returns, I will resume my life.” If you didn’t know what sleep was, and you had only seen it in a science fiction movie, you would think it was weird and tell all your friends about the movie you’d seen. “They had these people, you know? And they would walk around all day and be okay? And then, once a day, usually after dark, they would lie down on these special platforms and become unconscious. They would stop functioning almost completely, except deep in their minds they would have adventures and experiences that were completely impossible in real life. As they lay there, completely vulnerable to their enemies, their only movements were to occasionally shift from one position to another; or, if one of the ‘mind adventures’ got too real, they would sit up and scream and be glad they weren’t unconscious anymore. Then they would drink a lot of coffee.” So, next time you see someone sleeping, make believe you’re in a science fiction movie. And whisper, ‘The creature is regenerating itself."

— George Carlin  (via dancinguponthearchitecture)

(Source: xzxcuzx-me, via dancinguponthearchitecture)

Photo
hermionejg:

alwaysthreeoclock:

thisissomuchfun:

The Fault in our Stars

my favorite jg novel quote <3

If I weren’t so terrified of losing my deposit I would paint it onto the wall opposite my bed so that I could see it the moment I woke up every day. Instead there is just the white wall of nothingness.

hermionejg:

alwaysthreeoclock:

thisissomuchfun:

The Fault in our Stars

my favorite jg novel quote <3

If I weren’t so terrified of losing my deposit I would paint it onto the wall opposite my bed so that I could see it the moment I woke up every day. Instead there is just the white wall of nothingness.

(Source: smiletoowide)

Photo
hermionejg:

alwaysthreeoclock:

thisissomuchfun:

The Fault in our Stars

my favorite jg novel quote &lt;3

If I weren’t so terrified of losing my deposit I would paint it onto the wall opposite my bed so that I could see it the moment I woke up every day. Instead there is just the white wall of nothingness.

hermionejg:

alwaysthreeoclock:

thisissomuchfun:

The Fault in our Stars

my favorite jg novel quote <3

If I weren’t so terrified of losing my deposit I would paint it onto the wall opposite my bed so that I could see it the moment I woke up every day. Instead there is just the white wall of nothingness.

(Source: smiletoowide)

Photo
lalulutres:

Edinburgh Castle, Scotland

lalulutres:

Edinburgh Castle, Scotland

(via dancinguponthearchitecture)

Photo

(Source: , via kayleyhyde)

Photo
left-nut:

untitled by ★illinifellow on Flickr.